NYC College of Technology Catalog (2024)

Table of Contents
Applying for Federal and New York State Financial Aid In Cases of Unusual Circ*mstances Applying for Aid Is an Annual Process Financial Need and Expected Family Contribution (EFC) SAR Submission Policy The Cost of Attendance (Student’s Budget) Student Resources Study Abroad Permit-Out Students and Financial Aid Payments Permit-Out (Colleges within CUNY) Permit-Out (Non-CUNY Colleges) Federal Student Eligibility Referral of Fraud Cases Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard (SAP) Minimum Retention Standard Financial Aid Suspension Right to Appeal Financial Aid Probation Re-Establishing Eligibility Determining Attempted Credits and Accumulated Credits and Applying Credits to SAP Treatment of Non-Standard Situations Change of Degree Discretionary Fund Appeal for Lost TAP Types of Federal Financial Aid Programs Federal PELL Grant Federal Campus-Based Programs Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) Federal Work-Study Program Federal Perkins Loan William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Interest Rates on Subsidized Loans and Unsubsidized Loans Direct Subsidized Loan and Direct Unsubsidized Loan Processing Fees: William D. Ford Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans How to Apply for a Direct Loan How to apply for Alternative Private Loans The Certification for Alternative Loans is Handled in the Following Manner: Borrowing Limits William D. Ford Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Direct Consolidation Loans Exit Counseling and Repaying Your Loans When Students Cannot Pay the Loan Loan Default and Regaining Eligibility for Federal Aid Loan Cancellation/ Forgiveness/Discharge Total Withdrawals and the Return of Federal Title IV Funds New York State Financial Aid Program Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) Income Limits Part-Time TAP Aid for Part-time Study (APTS) New York City Council Merit Scholarships Excelsior Scholarship Opportunity Programs Five-Year Undergraduate Programs Students with Disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Appeals Award Amount* Duration Payment NYS Academic Progress Standard Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) Eligibility Requirements: Important Notes on New York State Financial Aid Eligibility Discretionary Fund Appeal for Lost TAP Veteran Financial Aid Information Students Rights and Responsibilities Program Pursuit Chart for All Students Academic Progress Chart Academic Progress Chart 2006 Standards Academic Progress Chart

Navigated to Financial Aid.

New York City College of Technology (NYCCT) participates in all federal and state financial aid programs. Financial aid is available to students in the form of grants, loans and work-study.

Grants provide funds that do not have to be repaid. Loans must be repaid. Federal Work-Study consists of part-time employment, either on campus or in an outside agency.

Full-time students are best positioned to capitalize on the maximum awards. For financial aid purposes, a student is considered to be full-time if he or she is registered for a minimum of 12 credits/units or the equivalent or equated credits/units within the semester. A student is considered part-time if he or she is registered for fewer than 12 credits/units or equated credits/units during a semester.

Applying for Federal and New York State Financial Aid

Students should complete three financial aid applications. The first application is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which can be found online at www.fafsa.gov. To begin, students should apply for a federal student aid identification (FSAID) at www.studentaid. ed.gov, which allows students to apply, make corrections and access their federal financial aid information easily. Parents of dependent students should also apply for an FSAID. The college code for City Tech is 002696 and should be indicated on the FAFSA.

The FAFSA is an application for Federal Pell Grant, Federal Work-Study, Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity (FSEOG) Grants. Students applying for Federal Direct Loans must complete both the FAFSA and the Direct Loan Processing Form. If a student does not wish to file online, he or she may file the paper FAFSA by going to www.fafsa.gov/options.htm. The paper FAFSA must be completed, signed and mailed to the processor. This process will take approximately 2 to 3 weeks.

The second financial aid application is for the New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). Students can apply for TAP through the link for New York State residents on the FAFSA on the web Submission Confirmation Page. They will be asked to establish a PIN for TAP which allows them to apply for TAP, keep track of application information and make changes. The TAP college code for City Tech is 1405. Students who file the TAP application are considered for New York State financial assistance programs (TAP, Aid for Part-time Study {APTS}, Part-time TAP {PTAP}). Those who use a paper FAFSA to apply for federal aid may still choose to complete the TAP application on the web at www.hesc.ny.gov. Approximately 3-4 business days after submitting the FAFSA, the student will receive an email message to go to www.hesc.ny.gov to complete the TAP web-based application. Students who choose not to apply online will receive an Express TAP Application (ETA) in the mail.

The third application is the CUNY Supplement Form. Students should log into the CUNY Portal to complete the CUNY Financial Aid Supplement online. It is used to calculate Aid for Part-time Study (APTS), and Federal Perkins Loan. Students who do not wish to receive APTS or a Federal Perkins Loan do not have to complete the CUNY Supplement Form.

When the FAFSA is processed, students receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) from the U.S. Department of Education via email or by mail if the student did not provide an email address. The SAR displays the information submitted on the FAFSA including the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). See the section on “Financial Need and Expected Family Contribution (EFC)” below. Students should review the SAR to make sure the financial and biographic information are correct and make corrections as soon as possible online. Alternatively, students can come to the financial aid office with supporting documentation to make changes. Students should check their CUNYfirst account “Student Services Center” to-do list for a complete list of requested documents. Students also receive an email from the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation regarding eligibility for TAP. An award letter is sent to part-time students acknowledging eligibility for APTS after certification from the financial aid office. An award letter from the financial aid office includes all awards that they are eligible for during the award year.

In Cases of Unusual Circ*mstances

If a student is required to provide parental data on the FAFSA, but cannot because of extreme circ*mstances that have caused involuntary separation from his/her parents, the student should see a financial aid counselor and ask about dependency reclassification. The student must follow the process given on the “Dependency Reclassification Appeal Form.” In addition, if the student or the student’s family has experienced a change in situation from the prior year, such as loss of employment, separation of parents or some other hardship, the student should see a financial aid counselor to review the federal financial aid application and the family’s current finances. This process of review may lead to an income adjustment that more closely reflects the current circ*mstance. The student must complete the FAFSA first, using the income for the year as requested on the application and inquire about an income reduction. The student must follow the guidance given on the “Income Adjustment Request Form.” Both the “Dependency Re- classification Appeal Form” and the “Income Adjustment Request Form” are located on the financial aid website at http://www.citytech. cuny.edu/fnancial-aid/forms.aspx.

Applying for Aid Is an Annual Process

Students must file for financial aid annually starting in October for the upcoming academic year (summer, fall and spring terms).

Students may also go to the financial aid application review site/web lab, located in Namm Hall, room G 08A, if they need assistance in completing their applications. Please call 718.260.5700 or go to the City Tech financial aid website located at http://www.citytech.cuny. edu/financial-aid/ to check office hours.

Financial Need and Expected Family Contribution (EFC)

Financial aid eligibility is based on financial need (except for unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan and PLUS Loan). When students apply for federal student aid, the information reported on the FAFSA is used in a formula established by the U.S. Congress that calculates the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). The EFC is the amount the student and parents (if the student is dependent) are expected to contribute toward the student’s education. If the EFC is within a certain range, students are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant.

The EFC is used to determine financial need. When CUNY receives a student’s FAFSA information from the Department of Education, CUNY develops the student’s budget or cost of attendance. The budget is based on whether the student lives with the parents or away from home and if the student will attend college for one full academic year (9 months) or one semester (4.5 months).

The EFC is subtracted from the Cost of Attendance (COA). The remainder is financial need. The “financial need” equals the COA minus the EFC. The student may not receive financial aid in excess of his financial need. In other words, the student’s financial need is the maximum amount of financial aid, including Federal Subsidized Direct Loan the student may receive for an academic year.

Besides determining the amount the student can receive from the Pell Grant, the federal EFC is also used to determine eligibility for Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work- Study (FWS) and the Federal Perkins loan.

SAR Submission Policy

All students’ correct and complete FAFSA information (SAR) must be processed by the U.S. Department of Education and received by the school before the last day of enrollment to be eligible for federal financial aid. If a student is advised that his/her FAFSA information is subject to verification, the student must submit all requested documents to the financial aid office and the information must be processed and finalized with the U.S. Department of Education within 120 days of the student’s last day of attendance. Failure to submit the required documentation may result in loss of Federal Financial Aid. The Office of Financial Aid will notify students of any changes to EFC or Cost of Attendance via email at their official City Tech email addresses.

The Cost of Attendance (Student’s Budget)

The cost of attendance or budget is an estimate of the amount of money it will cost a student to attend college for an academic year set each year by the University. It includes tuition, fees, books, transportation, housing and food expenses.

Student Resources

Students should consider the resources that they will have from earnings and savings, the amount their parents can contribute and any benefits that will be received, such as Social Security, veteran’s benefits, or unemployment that can be used at the beginning of the semester. Savings from summer employment can help meet the initial costs of enrollment; however, students will need additional money for books, supplies, and transportation. If financial aid exceeds tuition charges, students may qualify for an early partial disbursem*nt of the Pell Grant in the form of a book advance payment.

Study Abroad

Students who enroll in an overseas program of study approved by the College are eligible to receive federal financial aid and, in some cases, state aid. The coursework for which they enroll must be applicable to their degrees.

Permit-Out Students and Financial Aid Payments

Students who wish to take courses at other CUNY or non-CUNY colleges need to be aware of how financial aid payments will be made.

Permit-Out (Colleges within CUNY)

Students who are on permit-out at another CUNY college (the Host College) pay their

tuition and fee charges at City Tech, the Home College and may be paid financial aid at City Tech upon submission of proof of registration (which must have official registrar’s stamp) from the host college. At the end of the semester, students must also submit their official transcripts to the Financial Aid Office, Namm Hall, room G 13. A negative service indicator will be placed on the records of students who do not submit an official transcript two weeks after the end of the semester.

Permit-Out (Non-CUNY Colleges)

The Non-CUNY Permit Form requires approval/ signature of a financial aid counselor or staff member. A consortium agreement must be completed in order to receive financial aid for classes taken at non-CUNY institutions.

Federal Student Eligibility

To receive aid from any of the federal student aid programs, a student must meet all of the following conditions:

• demonstrate financial need, except for Direct Unsubsidized and PLUS Loans,

• have a high school diploma or equivalent or have been home schooled,

• be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a student working toward a degree or certificate in an eligible program,

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen,

• have a valid Social Security number (unless student is from the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia or the Republic of Palau),

• meet satisfactory academic progress standards,

• certify that federal student aid will be used only for educational purposes,

• certify that the student is not in default on a federal student loan and that he or she does not owe money on a federal student grant,

• be in compliance with Selective Service registration regulations (males only)

• meet enrollment status requirements,

• resolve any drug conviction issue

• not receive more than twelve semesters of full-time Federal Pell Grant payments; such students are ineligible for additional Federal Pell Grant and Federal SEOG.

• meet all admissions and academic advisem*nt requirements

The Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended (HEA) suspends aid eligibility for a student who has been convicted under federal or state law of the sale or possession of drugs, if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study). If the student has lost federal student aid eligibility due to a drug conviction, he or she can regain eligibility by passing two unannounced drug tests conducted by a drug rehabilitation program that complies with criteria established by the U.S. Department of Education.

Students subject to involuntary civil commitment after completing a period of incarceration for a forcible or non-forcible sexual offense are ineligible to receive Federal Pell Grants.

Students ineligible for federal aid should still complete the FAFSA to see if they may be eligible for non-federal aid from states and private institutions. When students regains eligibility during the award year, they should notify their financial aid administrators immediately. Students convicted of a drug- related offense after submission of the FAFSA may lose eligibility for federal student aid, and might be liable for returning any financial aid received during the period of ineligibility.

Referral of Fraud Cases

Any student, employee, or other individual suspected of misreporting information or altering documents to fraudulently obtain federal funds will be reported, with all evidence gathered, to the Office of Inspector General.

Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard (SAP)

Students must be making satisfactory academic progress towards completing their degree in order to remain eligible for federal financial aid at City Tech.

There are three components to City Tech’s satisfactory academic progress standard:

1. Minimum GPA – Students must achieve at least the GPA required to meet the

College’s minimum retention standard listed below; students enrolled in a program of more than two years must have a GPA of at least a 2.0 or equivalent or must have an academic standing consistent with the College’s graduation requirements.

While students are enrolled at City Tech, their academic performance is continually evaluated. Evaluation is based on cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA). Students who do not meet the College’s minimum retention standard below, may run the risk of academic probation or dismissal.

Minimum Retention Standard

Credits or Units Attempted

Minimum GPA

.5 – 12

1.50

13 – 24

1.75

25 – upward

2.00

2. Maximum Time-frame – Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits/

units normally required for completion of their degree. Students pursuing a two-year degree program (requiring 60 credits or units) fail to meet academic progress if they attempt 90 or more credits/ units. Students pursuing a four year degree program (requiring 120 credits or units) fail to meet academic progress if they attempt more than 180 credits/units.

2. Pace of Progression – For students pursuing an associate or baccalaureate degree, accumulated or earned credits must be equal to or greater than a certain percentage of the total credits attempted according to the following tables:

Associate Degrees (Two-Year Programs)

Attempted Credits

6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72

78 84

90

Earned Credits

0 0 2 4 6 13 19 23 27 33 39 44

49 55

61

Baccalaureate Degrees (Four-Year Programs)

Attempted Credits

15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 135 150 165

180

Earned Credits

0 5 16 27 42 50 63 72 84 95 110

120

All students (whether aid recipients or not) will be measured against each of the three SAP components at the end of the spring term to determine eligibility for federal financial aid for the upcoming award year.

Financial Aid Suspension

Students who fall below the College’s GPA standard, exceed the maximum time frame, or fail to meet the pace of progression standard, will be placed on financial aid suspension and lose their eligibility to receive federal financial aid. Such students will remain ineligible for federal financial aid until they take actions that meet the appropriate academic progress standard.

Right to Appeal

Students who have been placed on federal financial aid suspension may appeal to the Committee on Financial Aid Standing to regain their eligibility to receive federal student aid. Students may appeal any component of the satisfactory academic progress standard they have not been able to meet including not meeting the minimum GPA and exceeding the maximum time frame for program completion.

An appeal must be based upon mitigating circ*mstances resulting from events such as, personal illness or injury, illness or death of a family member, recent loss of employment, or changes in the academic program. The appeal must include an explanation of why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress and what has changed in the student’s situation to allow him to meet the appropriate academic progress standard in future evaluation. The student must also submit proof and documentation of mitigating circ*mstances.

The Committee on Financial Aid Standing will determine whether the documentation shows that a student experienced mitigating circ*mstances. If the Committee on Financial Aid Standing determines that the student has a reasonable chance of regaining academic eligibility, the Committee will grant the appeal.

Financial Aid Probation

As part of granting an appeal, the Committee determines whether the student is able to regain academic eligibility in one semester, or needs more than one semester to regain eligibility. If the College determines that a student should regain his or her academic standing in one semester, the student’s financial aid will be reinstated for the semester (probationary semester), and the College will evaluate the student’s academic progress at the end of the probationary semester to determine if the student has regained his academic standing. If the student meets the academic requirements, he or she will continue to receive federal financial aid. If a student fails to meet the academic requirements at the end of the probationary semester, his financial aid will be suspended.

If the College determines that the student needs more than one semester to regain academic eligibility, the College will develop an academic plan with the student and reinstate the student’s financial aid for the probationary semester (initial semester). At the end of the initial probationary semester, the College will review the student’s academic progress to determine if he or she has fulfilled the requirements of his academic plan. If the student meets the requirements of the academic plan, he or she will continue to receive federal financial aid on a monitored, semester-by-semester basis until the next scheduled academic progress evaluation.

There is no limit on the number of times a student may go through the financial aid appeals procedure. Although a student may file only one appeal per payment period (semester), additional appeals to extend financial aid probation to subsequent semesters are allowed. As in the original appeal, the student would indicate the mitigating circ*mstances, the reasons why satisfactory academic progress was not achieved, and what has changed that will ensure the student will be able to meet satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation. If a student fails to meet the conditions of an approved academic plan, he or she may submit an additional appeal to modify or adjust the plan for the subsequent payment period(s) documenting any unusual circ*mstances that prevented him or her from meeting the goals established by the original plan. The Committee on Financial Aid Standing may approve or decline the subsequent appeal or may create an updated plan based on the information submitted.

Re-Establishing Eligibility

Other than having eligibility restored through fling a successful appeal, students on financial aid suspension may regain eligibility only by taking action that brings them back into compliance with the appropriate progress standard. The mere passage of time is insufficient to restore federal financial aid eligibility to students who have lost eligibility due to not meeting the satisfactory academic progress standard. Therefore, students may not re-establish eligibility solely by leaving City Tech for at least one year because this action alone does not bring students into compliance for federal financial aid academic progress standards.

Students who choose to remain enrolled without receiving federal financial aid may request a review of their academic record after any term in which they were on financial aid suspension to determine if they re-attained the appropriate standard. Students on financial aid suspension at the beginning of the academic year for not meeting one or more components of the College’s satisfactory academic progress standard, but who meet them at some point later in the academic year, may regain federal financial aid.

Determining Attempted Credits and Accumulated Credits and Applying Credits to SAP

Attempted credits pertain to the courses and credits that must be included in the quantitative measure of progress to calculate pace of progression and maximum time frame. The accumulation of attempted credits usually reflects the semester course enrollment maintained in a student’s permanent record at City Tech and will usually reflect a student’s enrollment as of the Form A date ( last day of “drop period”). Accumulated credits should reflect credits that the student has earned towards the completion of the degree program in which the student is enrolled. In measuring satisfactory academic progress, certain types of courses, situations, and procedures may affect a student’s GPA and pace of progression and are treated in the following way:

1. Remedial Courses – Since remedial courses and the remedial component of developmental and compensatory courses do not carry degree credit, the non-credit component of these courses is not included in the total cumulative attempted credits or accumulated credits for determining pace of progression. However, the credit-bearing portion of compensatory or developmental courses is included in cumulative earned and/or attempted credit totals for determining pace.

2. Withdrawals – Since the Form A date usually reflects a student’s course load for the term, classes that are dropped during the program adjustment period are not included as cumulative attempted credits. Withdrawals which are recorded on a student’s permanent record are included as cumulative attempted credits and have an adverse affect on a student’s ability to meet the pace of progression standard.

NOTE: Retroactive “non-punitive” administrative withdrawal activity may require students to repay any assistance received as a result of enrollment at the time of receipt of assistance funds.

3. Incomplete Grades – Courses with incomplete grades are included as attempted credits. However, these courses cannot be used as credits accumulated toward the degree If a student later receives a letter grade above an F in an incomplete course, that course can then be included in the accumulated credits that determine eligibility for the term and subsequent terms within the academic year.

4. Repeated Courses – Successfully completed courses can generally be accepted toward degree requirements once. However, each time a student attempts a course, even if that course is part of a forgiveness or amnesty policy whereby credits attempted and grades earned in prior semesters are excluded from the GPA, it must be included as part of the cumulative attempted credit record for the measuring of pace of progression. Therefore, repeated courses, regardless of the prior grade, may make it more difficult to meet the pace of progression standard.

Note: revised regulations allow students to receive federal financial aid for one repeat of a previously passed course as long as students are again receiving credit for the course. Should students subsequently fail the course, any additional attempt of that course cannot be included in students’ enrollment status for federal financial aid. There is no regulatory limit on the number of times students may be paid to retake a failed course unless they have also previously passed the course.

5. Transfer of Credit – Transfer students have their status initialized for measuring

satisfactory academic progress by counting the transfer credits accepted toward the degree as both credits attempted and credits earned.

Treatment of Non-Standard Situations

1. Readmitted Students – Upon readmission after any period of non-re-enrollment, students’ academic progress standing is re-evaluated as it was at the end of the successful appeal to re-establish eligibility.

2. Second Degree Students – Students enrolling for a second baccalaureate or associate degree have their pace of progression status initialized for purposes of satisfactory academic progress measurement by using the number of credits determined to be acceptable toward the degree as both the students’ cumulative attempted credits and cumulative earned credits. Students who completed 4-year degrees are not eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant or a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG).

3. Change of Major – Students who change their major within the same degree or certificate program have their academic progress standard (maximum time frame) initialized as the number of credits accepted, number of credits earned, and the number of credits attempted toward the new degree.

Change of Degree

For students changing objectives and pursuing different degrees or certificates, academic progress (maximum time frame) is evaluated based on the time frame established for the new degree or certificate.

Discretionary Fund Appeal for Lost TAP

Students who have lost TAP funding because of a documentable college advisem*nt and/or administrative error have the option to appeal to the Discretionary Fund Appeals Committee to request funds lost as a result of the error.

The Discretionary Fund Appeals Committee members are appointed by the Vice President of Enrollment and Student Affairs and this committee will review all appeals. An appeal must be based upon circ*mstances resulting from the error and the appeal must include supporting documentation. The student must follow the directions provided on the “Discretionary Fund Appeals Form,” which is located in the New Student Center or on the website at http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/ nsc/resources.aspx. If the Discretionary Fund Appeals Committee determines that the student has a valid claim, the Committee will grant the appeal. Please note, all decisions made by the committee are final.

Types of Federal Financial Aid Programs

Federal PELL Grant

A Federal Pell Grant is a financial aid award that does not have to be repaid. Pell Grants are awarded only to undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree. For many students, a Pell Grant provides a foundation of financial aid to which other aid may be added.

Effective July 1, 2012, eligibility for the Pell Grant is limited to 12 semesters of full- time payments or its equivalent. Students can track their remaining Pell Grant eligibility on www.nslds.ed.gov (National Student Loan Data System) on www.studentaid.ed.gov or through their Student Aid Report (SAR).

Awards for the academic year will depend on program funding. To be eligible, students must continue to make satisfactory academic progress and must not owe any repayment on prior Federal Pell Grants, received more than twelve semesters of full- time Pell payments, or be in default of any Federal student loans.

Disbursem*nt information is published each academic year in the “Financial Aid Payment Calendar,” available at the Financial Aid Office and online. Students are paid by check, the CUNY Scholar Support Prepaid card, or by direct deposit.

To qualify for any federal financial aid payments, students must actually begin attending classes. Before disbursing Pell awards, enrollment status is verified. The credits for any course that a student never attended (WN grade) are not counted in calculating the enrollment status. Classes dropped after the financial aid certification date (between the 8th and 21st day of classes; WD grade) may still be counted toward student enrollment status and financial aid eligibility.

Summer Pell awards are funded from the remaining funds of the prior academic year or from funds awarded for the upcoming academic year. For more information, visit our website or download the Summer Session Information Guide, published each year, or pick up a copy at the Financial Aid Office, Namm Building, room N/G 13.

Federal Campus-Based Programs

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program, Federal Work Study (FWS) Program and the Federal Perkins Loan Program are considered campus-based programs, because they are administered by the University. The amount of aid students receive depends on financial need, the amount of other aid received and the availability of funds. To qualify for these programs, students must be enrolled at least half-time and be making satisfactory academic progress.

Below is a brief description of these programs:

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

FSEOG is for undergraduates with exceptional need who have not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree. As with other grants, FSEOG does not have to be paid back.

Federal Work-Study Program

The Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program provides an opportunity for students to be placed in a part- time job that will accommodate their academic schedule during the school year. FWS is awarded to students with high need. Applicants must have a FWS award and must be enrolled at least half-time (6 real or equated credits). The Financial Aid Office arranges jobs on and off campus, with public or private non-profit agencies, for up to 20 hours a week and hosts orientation and placement sessions throughout the year. At these sessions, the work-study program is explained and students receive help with the job selection process. Students must stop working when they have earned their total award.

Federal Perkins Loan

Loans are available to students who are maintaining satisfactory academic progress and are enrolled at least half-time (6 credits) in an approved post-secondary institution. Students must complete the FAFSA to apply. To qualify, they must complete an “entrance interview” online at http://www. heartlandecsi.com/ for each academic year for which they are receiving the Perkins loan. Generally, only continuing students with 28 or more cumulative credits and a minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0 are awarded Perkins Loans.

The current interest rate of 5% is not charged while students are enrolled for at least half-time study. Once students graduate, stop attending the College, or cease to be at least half-time, they must complete an “exit interview” online at http://www. heartlandecsi.com/. Repayment begins nine months later, at which time interest will be charged, and students are responsible for repaying the principal and the interest that accrues during the period of repayment. The period of repayment may extend over of ten years or may be shorter or can be extended during periods of hardship. For example, students can apply for a postponement or deferment of payment for a given period of time due to loss of a job. Students can also qualify for cancellation of all or part of the loan repayment for service in fields such as teaching, law enforcement and nursing.

Student’s obligation to repay may be partially or totally discharged in the event of death, total and permanent disability, school closures or bankruptcy. If students fail to make a scheduled payment when due or fail to apply for a postponement, deferment or cancellation in a timely manner, or do not comply with the terms and conditions of any loan, the College can declare the loan in default. When a loan goes into default, the student is no longer eligible for additional federal financial aid until the default is cleared and the loan is rehabilitated. Students may rehabilitate a defaulted Perkins loan by requesting rehabilitation and by making voluntary, on- time monthly payments, as determined by the school, each month for nine consecutive months. For more information on the Perkins Loan, go to www.studentaid.ed.gov

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Interest Rates on Subsidized Loans and Unsubsidized Loans

The interest rate on unpaid balances of Direct Subsidized loans are based on the period of time when the loans were first disbursed.

The interest rate of Direct Subsidized loans is variable and may change on July 1st of each year, but will never exceed 8.25%.

The interest rates for Subsidized Loans and Unsubsidized Loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2014 and before July 1, 2015 is 4.66%.

The interest rates for Subsidized Loans and Unsubsidized Loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2013 and before July 1, 2014 is 3.86%.

For current Direct Loan interest rates, please visit https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/.

Direct Subsidized Loan and Direct Unsubsidized Loan Processing Fees:

For Direct Loans first disbursed on or after December 1, 2013 and before October 1, 2014 the processing fee is 1.072%.

For Direct Loans first disbursed on or after October 1, 2014 and before October 1, 2015, the processing fee is 1.073%. There is also a new limit on eligibility for Direct Subsidized Loans for new borrowers on or after July 1, 2013: A new borrower on or after July 1, 2013 will not be eligible for new Direct Subsidized Loans if the period during which the borrower has received such loans exceeds 150 percent of the published length of the borrower’s educational program. The law also provides that a borrower reaching the 150 percent limit becomes ineligible for interest subsidy benefits on all Direct Subsidized loans first disbursed to that borrower on or after July 1, 2013.

For more information please go to www. studentloans.gov.

The Federal Direct Student Loan Program, established by the Student Loan Reform Act of 1993, provides low-interest loans for students and parents. Under the Direct Loan Program, the federal government makes loans directly to students and parents through the College.

There are three kinds of Direct Loans available through NYCCT:

1. William D. Ford Federal Direct “Subsidized” Loan is awarded on the basis of financial need – see “Financial Need and Expected Family Contribution (EFC)” section. For students who qualify for a Subsidized Loan, the federal government pays the interest on the loan while students are in school and during the six-month grace period after graduation or falling below half-time enrollment, on loans made prior to July 1, 2012. However, new Direct Subsidized loans made from July 1, 2012 to July 30, 2014 are not eligible for subsidized interest benefits during the six-month grace period after graduation or falling below half-time enrollment. Interest accrues during the grace period and is capitalized if unpaid by the borrower.

2. William D. Ford Federal Direct “Unsubsidized” Loan is not awarded on the basis of need. If students qualify for an unsubsidized loan, they will be charged interest from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. Students can choose to pay the interest or allow it to accumulate. If students allow the interest to accumulate, it will be capitalized, that is, the interest will be added to the principal amount of the loan and will increase the amount that has to be repaid. If the interest is paid as it accumulates, students will have less to repay in the long run.

3. William D. Ford Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) is a loan that parents of dependent students can borrow to pay for their education.

NOTE: If your parents don’t qualify for a PLUS Loan, you might be able to get additional funds up to the amount listed as an independent undergraduate student.

William D. Ford Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans

How to Apply for a Direct Loan

In order to be considered for a Federal Direct Subsidized or Unsubsidized loan, students must first file the FAFSA and resolve all problems relating to it. They must also complete the “William D. Ford Federal Direct Loans Processing Form” for the appropriate academic year. Additionally, all first time Direct Loan applicants or students who have not completed a loan entrance counseling session online, must do so before the actual loan can be processed. If a student completed an online session for another college, he or she must add New York City College of Technology to his or her school list and bring a copy of the confirmation page to the Financial Aid Office. To access the loan entrance counseling session, go to www.studentloans.gov.

How to apply for Alternative Private Loans The Certification for Alternative Loans is Handled in the Following Manner:

1. All students must file and resolve all problems with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), for the academic year for which they are applying for the loan.

2. Students must be enrolled in a program of study for at least 6 credits or equated credits.

3. If eligible, students should apply for loans through the William D. Ford Direct Loan Program.

4. Students must choose their lender and apply by using the lender’s website and completing the Self-Certification Form.

5. The lender will notify the student of the results of their credit check and, if approved, will notify the school of their loan request and approved credit.

6. In determining loan amounts, no amount can exceed the cost of attendance minus other aid for the loan period. (The amount may be different from the amount the lender approved)

7. The Financial Aid Office will then certify the loan and communicate with the lender directly. If the loan is not certified, we will notify the student/student’s lender of the reason(s).

8. The loan will be disbursed in two equal payments per semester. Summer disbursem*nts will be paid when the student has completed 6 credits.

Borrowing Limits

Matriculated students enrolled in an eligible program of study with at least 6 credits may receive a Direct Loan. They must also meet other general eligibility requirements (see “Federal Student Eligibility” section).

The maximum amount that may be borrowed under the Direct Loan Program by a dependent undergraduate student for loans first distributed on or after July 1, 2008 is:

• $5,500 for a first-year student (completed 0-29.9 credits) enrolled in a program of study that is at least a full academic year. (with a maximum of $3,500 in subsidized loans).

• $6,500 if that student has completed the first year of study (completed 30-59.9 credits) and the remainder of the student’s program is at least a full academic year. (with a maximum of $4,500 in subsidized loans).

• $7,500 per year if the student is enrolled in a four-year program, has completed two years of study (completed 60 or more credits) and the remainder of the student’s program is at least a full academic year. (with a maximum of $5,500 in subsidized loans).

The maximum amount that may be borrowed under the Direct Loan Program by an independent undergraduate student is:

• $9,500 if the student is a first-year student (completed 0-29.9 credits) enrolled in a program of study that is at least a full academic year. (with a maximum of $3,500 in subsidized loans).

• $10,500 if the student has completed the first year of study (completed 30-59.9 credits) and the remainder of the student’s program is at least a full academic year. (with a maximum of $4,500 in subsidized loans).

• $12,500 per year if the student is enrolled in a four-year program, has completed two years of study (60 credits or more) and the remainder of the student’s program is at least a full academic year. (with a maximum of $5,500 in subsidized loans).

For periods of undergraduate study that are less than an academic year, the amount a student can borrow will be less than those listed above.

The total debt a student can have outstanding from all Direct Loans and Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program Loans combined is:

• $31,000 as a dependent undergraduate student. No more than $23,000 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.

• $57,500, as an independent undergraduate student. No more than $23,000 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.

To view Direct Loan information including servicer information, and total loan amounts borrowed, visit https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/.

William D. Ford Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

For parent borrowers, the Direct Loan Program offers the William D. Ford Federal Direct PLUS. These loans enable parents with good credit histories to borrow to pay the educational expenses of each child who is a dependent undergraduate student enrolled at least half-time. To apply, parent must complete the “William D. Ford Federal Plus Processing Form” for the appropriate academic year. CUNY requires that students complete the FAFSA if their parents wish to apply for a PLUS.

To be eligible to receive a Direct PLUS, parents are generally required to pass a credit check. If they do not pass the credit check, they may still be able to receive a loan if someone, such as a relative or friend, is able to pass the credit check, agrees to cosign the loan and promises to repay it if the parents should fail to do so. Parents may also qualify for a loan even if they do not pass the credit check if they can demonstrate that there are extenuating circ*mstances. Students and their parents must also meet other general eligibility requirements for federal student financial aid.

The yearly limit on Direct PLUS is equal to the cost of attendance minus any other financial aid for which a student is eligible.

For example, if a student’s cost of attendance is $6,000 and the student is eligible for $4,000 in other financial aid, the student’s parents could borrow up to, but no more than, $2,000. The interest rate for Direct Parent PLUS Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2014 and before July 1, 2015 is a fixed rate of 7.21%. Interest begins accruing once the loan is disbursed and repayment begins approximately 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed. Deferment is available until 6 months after the student is no longer enrolled at least half time; however, the interest continues to accrue. (Parents must request the deferment of payments)

For loans disbursed on or after December 1, 2013 and before October 1, 2014, parents will pay a fee of 4.288 percent of the loan, deducted proportionally each time a payment is made. For loans disbursed on or after October 1, 2014 and before October 1, 2015,parents will pay a fee of up to 4.292 percent of the loan, deducted proportionally each time a loan payment is made. A portion of this fee goes to the federal government to help reduce the cost of the loans. Also, if parents do not make their loan payments as scheduled, they may be charged late fees and collection costs. There is no cumulative loan limit for PLUS. The repayment term for PLUS is 10 years. Deferment and forbearance options are available when parents are having difficulty in repaying their loan.

Direct Consolidation Loans

A Direct Consolidation Loan is designed to help student borrowers to simplify loan repayment. Even though students may have several different federal student loans they will need to make only one payment per month for all the loans they consolidate. Students may even consolidate just one loan into a Direct Consolidation Loan to get benefits such as flexible repayment options.

Most federal student loans or PLUS can be consolidated. The Direct Loan Servicing Center provides students with a complete listing of eligible loans. The toll-free telephone number for the Direct Loan Servicing Center’s Consolidation Department is 800.557.7392. For more information, go to the website at www.studentloans.gov.

Exit Counseling and Repaying Your Loans

Students may borrow and not begin repayment as long as they remain enrolled at least half-time. Repayment begins six months after they cease to be at least half- time students. Payment of the principal is further deferred during study under a graduate fellowship program approved by the U.S. Commissioner of Education, during up to three years as a full- time Peace Corps or VISTA or similar national program volunteer.

Upon leaving school, or enrolling in less than 6 credits per semester, federal regulations require that students participate in an exit counseling session at www.studentloans. gov. This exit counseling session is designed to provide information regarding rights and responsibilities with regard to loan repayment, which include but are not limited to grace period, loan terms and conditions, where to send payment, payment options, conditions to defer repayment and what happens when the loan goes into default. To get an idea of what the repayment schedule might be, students can get customized estimates by using the online repayment calculators at Direct Loans on the web at www.studentloans.gov. They can also go to the National Student Loan Data System website at www.nslds.ed.gov or to https:// studentaid.ed.gov/sa/ for information on all U.S. Department of Education loans and grants.

When Students Cannot Pay the Loan

When students are having difficulty in repaying a loan, they can apply for forbearance (a temporary suspension or reduction of payments), or a deferment (delaying the repayment entirely). Deferments are granted when students are enrolled at least half-time in an approved post-secondary program or graduate fellowship program, are in rehabilitation training, are unemployed (3-year limit), or are experiencing economic hardship (3-year limit). A Federal Student Loan Ombudsman Office is available for assistance with loan problems at 1.877.557.2575 or by writing to: Ombudsman, Student Financial Assistance, U.S. Department of Education, Fourth Floor, 830 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20202-5144.

Loan Default and Regaining Eligibility for Federal Aid

When a student does not make loan payments and has not applied for forbearance or a deferment in a timely manner, the loan goes into default. If the loan is in default, the student cannot receive federal Title IV aid, i.e., Pell Grant, loans, FWS and SEOG, until he or she participates in one of the programs below to repay the loan:

  1. Loan Rehabilitation Program: The student can repair damaged credit by making 12 agreed-upon, voluntary, consecutive, on- time monthly payments to HESC/Loan Servicer.

  2. Renewed Eligibility for Financial Aid Program (REFA) or Renewed Eligibility for Title IV Aid (RETA): These programs help the student regain eligibility for all Title IV student financial aid programs. Before fling, however, the student must make

    6 agreed-upon, voluntary, consecutive, on-time monthly payments to HESC/Loan Servicer, and must continue monthly payments to continue eligibility.

    To find out more, the student can email defaulthelp@hesc.org or call 1.800.666.0991.

Loan Cancellation/ Forgiveness/Discharge

Under certain circ*mstances, a student loan, or a portion of the loan, may be canceled, forgiven, or discharged in cases such as death, total or partial disability and false certification. Students can call 1.800.666.0991 for information.

Total Withdrawals and the Return of Federal Title IV Funds

Federal regulation requires a school to calculate the amount of federal aid earned if a student begins the semester and then totally withdrawals. During thefirst60% of the term, students earn Title IV funds in proportion to the time they were enrolled. If students received more aid than they earned, the unearned portion must be returned to the Department of Education. If students received less aid than the amount earned, they may be eligible for a post withdrawal disbursem*nt.

The portion of aid students are entitled to receive is based on a percentage calculated by comparing the total number of days in the semester to the number of days completed before withdrawal. For example, students completing 20% of the semester earn 20% of the Title IV aid. Any student in that situation who had already received 100% of the Title IV aid must return the unearned 80%.

The amount to be returned is also considered an “overpayment” and must be returned within 45 days to the Department of Education. The college returns overpayments on students’ behalf; therefore, those students owe money to the college. An negative service indicator (hold) is placed on accounts until the outstanding balance is resolved. Students who remain enrolled beyond the 60% point of the term are considered to have earned all their aid and do not have to return any Title IV funds. Students who stop attending all of their courses are considered unofficially withdrawn and are only eligible for 50% of their federal aid. The College will contact students within 30 days from the College’s determination date to either offer post-withdrawal disbursem*nts or to notify the student of overpayments.

New York State Financial Aid Program

Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)

This grant is awarded to New York State residents who are enrolled full-time in a degree- granting program and meet the income criteria. To be eligible for a TAP award a student must:

1. be matriculated in an approved program of study and be in good academic standing. A matriculated student is one who has registered for courses and other academic activities that are recognized as contributing toward fulfilling the requirements for a specific degree or New York State recognized Certificate of at least 24 credits.

2. declare a degree major no later than 21 days from the start of the semester concerned For the specific deadline please refer to the academic calendar at www.citytech.cuny. edu/registrar/academic-calendar.aspx. This also includes the progression from associate to baccalaureate;

• upon completion of 30 credits, if enrolled in a two-year program (associate degree);

• upon completion of 60 credits, if enrolled in a four-year program (baccalaureate degree)

3. be enrolled for at least twelve (12) credit hours per semester, made up of remedial and non-remedial courses that are creditable towards the degree.

This definition excludes courses not directly creditable toward the student’s degree, including AAA 1010. Please note the accelerated rate of credit accrual for subsequent payments beyond the minimum twelve credits. This is shown in the charts at the end of this section.

4. be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen

5. have graduated from a high school in the U.S., or earned a GED, or passed a federally approved Ability to Benefit test as defined by the Commissioner of the State Education Department.

6. not be in default on a student loan.

7. meet income eligibility limitations.

Additionally, after receiving their first state award, students will continue to be eligible for further payments if they meet both PROGRAM PURSUIT and ACADEMIC PROGRESS requirements as outlined under NYS Academic Progress Standards.

Income Limits

Awards are made to dependent students and students who are married or have tax dependents if their NYS taxable income is $80,000 or less; to independent students who are married and have no tax dependents and the NYS taxable income is $40,000 or less, and to single independent students with no dependents if their NYS taxable income is $10,000 or less.

Associate level students may receive full-time TAP awards for up to six semesters, SEEK associate level students for eight semesters, baccalaureate level students for eight semesters, and SEEK baccalaureate level students for ten semesters.

A student with a disability that prevents attendance on a full-time basis (12 credits) may be eligible to receive TAP while attending on a part-time basis (3-11 credits).

Part-Time TAP

Part-time students at approved schools in New York State who were first-time, full- time freshmen in the 2006-07 Academic Year may be eligible for Part-Time TAP beginning in 2007-08. To apply, the student must complete the FAFSA and TAP applications. To be eligible for Part-Time TAP, a student must:

• be a first-time freshman in the 2006-07 Academic Year, or thereafter.

• have earned 12 credits or more in each of the two consecutive preceding semesters, for a minimum total of 24 credits earned.

• maintain a minimum of a “C” average (2.0 on a 4.0-point scale).

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen; be a legal resident of NYS; be registered for 6-11 required credits per semester; not be in default of a student loan and meet income eligibility limitations of TAP.

CUNY Student Tuition Assistance (CUSTA) Students who are otherwise eligible for a maximum TAP award but whose award is reduced because they have received four semesters of payment may be eligible for a CUSTA award of up to $100 per semester.

Aid for Part-time Study (APTS)

This award provides assistance to full-time and have not exhausted their TAP eligibility. In order to be eligible, a student must be a New York State resident and enrolled in at least six contributory credits, of which three must be non-remedial.

New York City Council Merit Scholarships

This award is a scholarship fund for high achieving students attending the City University of New York who have graduated from public and private high schools within the city. The award is funded at the level of $800per academic year ($400 per academic semester). To be eligible, students must meet the following criteria:

• Graduate from a New York City high school

• Enroll within a year of student graduation from high school as a first-time freshman

• Have a College Admissions Average (CAA) of 80 or above

For conditions of continued eligibility, students must:

1. Maintain continuous full-time enrollment within CUNY system.

2. Be limited to a maximum of six semesters of eligibility if enrolled in an associate degree program, and eight semesters if enrolled in a bachelor degree program, respectively

3. Enroll with a full-time course load per semester (12 credit/unit hours).

4. Earn a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of a “B” or 3.00.

Reinstatement and/or leave of absence appeals can only be based on extreme extenuating circ*mstances, as considered by the chief college academic administrator and approved by the Chancellor/Vice Chancellor with designated authority.

Excelsior Scholarship

The program covers tuition for eligible SUNY and CUNY students. The program will be phased in over three years, beginning in Fall 2017. It would first apply to families who earn $100,000 or less, then to those who earn $110,000 or less in 2018, and eventually reaching $125,000 or less in 2019.

How To Apply: https://www.hesc.ny.gov/ pay-for-college/financial-aid/types-of- financial-aid/nys-grants-scholarships-awards/ the-excelsior-scholarship.html

Additional details about the Excelsior Scholarship can be found http://www2.cuny. edu/financial-aid/scholarships/excelsior- scholarship-faqs/

To be eligible, students must meet the following criteria:

• be a resident of NYS and have resided in NYS for 12 continuous months prior to the beginning of the term;

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen;

• have either graduated from high school in the United States, earned a high school

equivalency diploma, or passed a federally approved “Ability to Benefit” test, as defined by the Commissioner of the State Education Department;

• have a combined federal adjusted gross income of $100,000 or less;

• be pursuing an undergraduate degree at a SUNY or CUNY college, including community colleges and the statutory colleges at Cornell University and Alfred University;

• be enrolled in at least 12 non-remedial credits per term and complete at least 30 credits each year (successively), applicable toward his or her degree program;

• if attended college prior to the 2017-18 academic year, have earned at least 30 credits each year (successively), applicable toward his or her degree program prior to applying for an Excelsior Scholarship;

• be in a non-default status on a student loan made under any NYS or federal education loan program or on the repayment of any NYS award;

• be in compliance with the terms of the service condition(s) imposed by a NYS award that you have previously received; and

• execute a Contract agreeing to reside in NYS for the length of time the award was received, and, if employed during such time, be employed in NYS.

A student who is not on track to complete an Associate’s degree in two consecutive years or Bachelor’s degree in four consecutive years (which requires completion of the equivalent of 30 credits each academic year) can catch up on missing credits to become eligible for an Excelsior Scholarship. If you successfully earn additional credits during a term or academic year and get back on track to completing your degree on time, you will be eligible to receive an Excelsior Scholarship for the remainder of your undergraduate degree program.

Opportunity Programs

If you are in an opportunity program, the program allows five years (which requires completion of the equivalent of 24 credits each academic year) to complete your degree on time.

Five-Year Undergraduate Programs

If you are in an undergraduate program of study normally requiring five-years, the program allows five years (which requires completion of the equivalent of 30 credits each academic year) to complete your degree on time.

Students with Disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

To be eligible for an Excelsior Scholarship, students with qualified disabilities under the Americans With Disabilities Act who attend less than full time must register with their college office for students with disabilities.

If you are a student with a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the program requires that you complete the credits attempted each semester to fulfill the requirement for on-time degree completion. If you have not earned credits for all courses attempted, you can catch up on missing credits if you successfully earn additional credits during a Summer or Winter session(s) and get back on track for credits that were not previously completed.

Students with disabilities determined to be ineligible who can demonstrate good cause for completing fewer credits than attempted and/or a break in attendance may appeal the decision by completing and submitting the Excelsior Scholarship Program Appeal Form to Excelsior.Appeals@hesc.ny.gov.

Appeals

Students determined to be ineligible who can demonstrate good cause for completing fewer credits than required and/or a break in attendance may appeal the decision by completing and submitting the Excelsior Scholarship Program Appeal Form to Excelsior.Appeals@hesc.ny.gov.

Award Amount*

A recipient of an Excelsior Scholarship may receive up to $5,500.

To determine the award amount, the resident tuition rate charged by SUNY (currently $6,470) or CUNY (currently $6,330) will be reduced by the amount of certain other student financial aid awards which an applicant has or will receive for the academic year, including a NYS Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) award and/or federal Pell grant. The Excelsior Scholarship will cover any remaining tuition liability up to $5,500; and a tuition credit will cover any remaining tuition expenses not covered by the Excelsior Scholarship.

*Note: Any award payment received may have tax implications. Any questions regarding this should be directed to a tax professional, the Internal Revenue Service, or the NYS Department of Taxation and Finance.

Duration

A recipient of an Excelsior Scholarship is eligible to receive award payments for not more than two years of full-time undergraduate study in a program leading to an associate’s degree or four years of full- time undergraduate study, or five years if the program of study normally requires five years, in a program leading to a bachelor’s degree.

Payment

To receive payments each subsequent year (after the initial application year), Excelsior Scholarship recipient must annually complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the TAP-on-The-Web Application each year.

NYS Academic Progress Standard Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) Eligibility Requirements:

Good academic standing for undergraduates:

• Education law requires a student whose first award year is in 2010-11 and thereafter to meet new standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Those meeting the definition of “remedial student” are not subject to the new academic standards, but remain on the 2006 SAP chart. For purposes of determining whether students shall be considered remedial, the following definition has been enacted:

“Remedial student” is defined as a student:

(a) whose scores on a recognized college placement exam or nationally recognized standardized exam indicated the need for remediation for at least two semesters, as certified by the college and approved by the State Education Department (SED); or

(b) who was enrolled in at least six semester hours of non-credit remedial courses, as approved by the SED, in the first term he or she received a TAP award; or

(c) who is or was enrolled in an opportunity program (HEOP, EOP, SEEK CD).

Students may continue to receive TAP if they meet both program pursuit and academic progress requirements as outlined on the following page.

Important Notes on New York State Financial Aid Eligibility

• New York State financial aid will pay for a repeated course only when a student received a prior failing grade, or if the major requires a higher grade than the student received in a particular course to satisfy degree requirements.

• Students cannot receive TAP if they are enrolled in only remedial courses. For the first TAP payment, a student must be full- time and must carry at least twelve (12) contributory credits, of which three (3) must be non-remedial. For the second through the final TAP payment, the student must be full-time and carry at least six (6) non- remedial credits, but must have accrued considerably more credits to qualify for the next payment. See chart on following page.

• The appeal process is an option for students who become ineligible for New York State financial aid because they do not meet the “C” average (2.0) requirement for TAP payments five through ten (see Academic Progress Chart above), or because they have not met some other requirement for good academic standing as outlined above.

• The appeal is fled by completing a TAP/ APTS Waiver Application for the semester the student is not in compliance with academic regulations. The waiver application form with supporting documentation is

then submitted to the Office of Student Affairs in the Namm Building, room 322, for consideration by the Committee on Financial Aid Standing. Regulations allow a student to receive more than one waiver when it specifically relates to the “C” average requirement, and another one- time waiver, specifically addressing the

good academic standing requirement. If the waiver is approved, the student will regain TAP eligibility for the semester for which the waiver is granted.

• The TAP/APTS Waiver Application is available at the Financial Aid Office, Namm Hall, room N/G 13.

Discretionary Fund Appeal for Lost TAP

Students who have lost TAP funding because of a documentable college advisem*nt and/ or administrative error have the option to appeal to the Discretionary Fund Appeals Committee to request funds lost as a result of the error. The Discretionary Fund Appeals Committee consists of the Director of the New Student Center and three professional advisors (including a transfer specialist); this committee will review all appeals. An appeal must be based upon circ*mstances resulting from the error and the appeal must include supporting documentation. The student must follow the directions provided on the “Discretionary Fund Appeals Form,” which is located in the New Student Center or on the website at http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/ nsc/resources.aspx. If the Discretionary Fund Appeals Committee determines that the student has a valid claim, the Committee will grant the appeal.

Veteran Financial Aid Information

For information regarding Veterans Administration educational benefits for veterans, reservists and eligible dependents, please go to www.citytech.cuny.edu/veterans

Students Rights and Responsibilities

As a financial aid recipient, a student has certain rights and responsibilities. To learn more, students can download a copy of the financial aid information guide, Student Financial Aid Recipient Rights & Responsibilities, from the financial aid website at www.citytech.cuny.edu/fnancial- aid/ or request a copy at the financial aid office.

Program Pursuit Chart for All Students

Minimum Credits/ for TAP

Payment Number:

To be eligible

Equated Credits completed with grades A, B, C, D, F,

S or R prior semester must be:

1

2

6

3

6

4

9

5

9

6

12

*7

12

*8

12

**9

12

**10

12

Academic Progress Chart

For undergraduate students receiving New York State aid prior to the 2006-2007 academic year

To be eligible for TAP Payment Number:

Minimum cumulative credits earned

to date must be:

Minimum cumulative grade point average

to date must be:

1

2

3

6

1.00

4

18

1.20

5

31

2.00

6

45

2.00

*7

60

2.00

*8

75

2.00

**9

90

2.00

**10

105

2.00

Academic Progress Chart 2006 Standards

(Applicable to all students receiving aid in 2007-08 through and including 2009-10 and SEEK and Remedial students first receiving aid in 2007-08 and thereafter)

For students enrolled in Baccalaureate Degree Programs:

To be eligible for TAP Payment Number:

Minimum cumulative credits earned

to date must be:

Minimum cumulative grade point average

to date must be:

1

2

3

4

5

6

*7

*8

**9

**10

3

9

21

33

45

60

75

90

105

1.1

1.2

1.3

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

For students enrolled in Associate Degree and Certificate Programs:

To be eligible for TAP Payment Number:

Minimum cumulative credits earned

to date must be:

Minimum cumulative grade point average

to date must be:

1

2

3

4

5

6

*7

*8

3

9

18

30

45

60

75

.5

.75

1.3

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

*Must be enrolled in a four-year program unless in the SEEK program or APTS recipient.

**Must be a SEEK student enrolled in a four-year program.

Academic Progress Chart

(Applicable to Non-remedial students first receiving aid in 2010-11 and thereafter)

For students enrolled in Baccalaureate Degree Programs:

To be eligible for TAP Payment Number:

Minimum cumulative credits earned

to date must be:

Minimum cumulative grade point average

to date must be:

1

2

3

4

5

6

*7

*8

**9

**10

6

15

27

39

51

66

81

96

111

1.5

1.8

1.8

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

*Must be enrolled in a four-year program unless in the SEEK program or APTS recipient.

**Must be a SEEK student enrolled in a four-year program.

For students enrolled in Associate Degree and Certificate Programs:

To be eligible for TAP Payment Number:

Minimum cumulative credits earned

to date must be:

Minimum cumulative grade point average

to date must be:

1

2

3

4

5

6

6

15

27

39

51

1.3

1.5

1.8

2.0

2.0

*Must be enrolled in a four-year program unless in the SEEK program or APTS recipient.

**Must be a SEEK student enrolled in a four-year program.

NYC College of Technology Catalog (2024)
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